GDPR Preparation: Recent Articles of Note

Company preparations for GDPR compliance are (or should be!) in full swing with the 25th May enforcement date fast looming on the horizon. With that in mind, I found the following set of recent GDPR articles a decent and interesting read. The list was compiled by Brian Pennington of Coalfire, he has kindly allowed me to repost.Eight Ways Board Directors Should Be Preparing for the GDPR Right NowGDPR: Whose problem is it anyway?ISACA has pulled together a list of some of the main tips that can help any enterprise to tackle GDPRRight to be Forgotten: Right Here, Right Now?Get Ready For The EU’s Kafkaesque Data #Privacy RulesIt’s time to grow your brokerage through GDPRData protection compliance costs less than noncomplianceBreach-Proofing Your Data in a GDPR WorldA GDPR Survival Guide For MarketersGDPR And Grassley ClashGDPR Highlights US Cyber RisksEurope's new...
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Cyber Security Roundup for January 2018

2018 started with a big security alert bang after Google Security Researchers disclosed serious security vulnerabilities in just about every computer processor in use on the planet. Named 'Meltdown' and 'Spectre’, when exploited by a hacker or malware, these vulnerabilities disclose confidential data. As a result, a whole raft of critical security updates was hastily released for computer and smartphone operating systems, web browsers, and processor drivers. While processor manufacturers have been rather lethargic in reacting and producing patches for the problem, software vendors such as Microsoft, Google and Apple have reacted quickly, releasing security updates to protect their customers from the vulnerable processors, kudos to them.The UK Information Commission's Office (ICO) heavily criticised the Carphone Warehouse for security inadequacies and fined the company £400K following their 2015 data breach, when the personal data, including bank details, of millions of Carphone Warehouse customers, was stolen by hackers, in what the company at the time described as a "sophisticated cyber attack", where have we heard that excuse before? Certainly the ICO wasn't buying that after it investigated, reporting a large number Carphone Warehouse's security failures, which included the use of software that was six years out of day,  lack of “rigorous...
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Meltdown and Spectre: Intel AMD ARM Processor Security Flaws Overview

The New Year has started with a big security bang after new dangerous security vulnerabilities were discovered within Intel, AMD and ARM processors, placing just about every Server, PC, Cloud Service, IoT device, Smartphone and Tablet on the planet at risk. Google Security Researchers, aka Project Zero, discovered the new computer processor flaws, which they have named 'Meltdown' and 'Spectre' when breaking the bad news on 3rd January 2018. Both Meltdown and Spectre allow an attacker or malware to access privileged information from within what should be a protected area of (kernel) memory. Meaning the potential disclosure of passwords, encryption keys, and confidential data from within virtual environments i.e. where multiple virtual machines are hosted on a single hardware platform. MeltdownThe Meltdown vulnerability is present on all Intel processors manufactured after 1995 and is the easiest of the two flaws to exploit. This vulnerability exploitation method is known as "rogue data cache load", and can be mitigated by applying the latest operation system patches/updates by Microsoft (KB4056892), Apple, and the various Linux distributions. However, the bad news is according to researchers, the patches are expected to slow (processors) computer...
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Cyber Security Roundup for December 2017

UK supermarket giant Morrisons, lost a landmark data breach court case in December after a disgruntled Morrisons employee had stolen and posted the personal records of 100,000 co-workers online, the supermarket chain was held liable for the data breach by the UK High Court. The High Court ruling now allows those affected to claim compensation for the "upset and distress" caused. Morrisons said it believed it should not have been held responsible and would be appealing against the decision. If the appeal is lost it could open up the possibility of further class action lawsuits cases by individuals. Pending the GDPR becoming law in May 2018, such a court ruling sets a legal precedent for individuals to claim damages after personal data losses by companies through the courts as well. After May 2018, the GDPR grants individuals the right sue companies for damages following personal data breaches. So we can expect 'ambulance chasers' lawyers to pick up on this aspect of the GDPR, with class action lawsuits following data breaches, it well could become the new "P.P.I. industry"Any businesses or individuals using Kaspersky should be aware the UK National Cyber Security Centre has warned government agencies against using...
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Cyber Security Roundup for November 2017

One of the most notable data breaches disclosed this month was by Uber, given the company attempted to cover up the breach by paying off hackers. Over a year ago the transport tech firm was said to have paid £75,000 to two hackers to delete 57 million Uber account records which they had stolen. Uber revealed around 2.7 million of the stolen records were British riders and drivers. As a UK Uber rider, this could mean me, I haven't received any notification of the data breach from Uber as yet. The stolen information included names, email addresses, and phone numbers. Uber can expect enforcement action from regulators on both sides of the pond, the UK Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) said it had "huge concerns" about the breach and was investigating.Jewson, Cash Converters, and Imgur all reported losing data due to hacks this month, while Equifax has reported suffering significant negative financial losses following their high profile hack of personal customer data. Equifax reported their net income had dropped by £20 million due to the hack, and their breach bill was coming in at a whopping £67 million.November was a...
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Cyber Security Roundup for October 2017

State-orchestrated cyber attacks have dominated the media headlines in October, with rogue state North Korea and its alleged 6,800 strong cyber force blamed for several cyber attacks. International intelligence scholars believe the North Korean leadership are using cyber warfare to up the political ante with their ongoing dispute with the United States. The North Koreans, as well as terrible security practices, were directly blamed by the UK National Audit Office for the recent NHS WannaCry attack (despite North Korea denying it). North Korea was also reported to be implicated in the stealing US War Plans from South Korea, and for a spear phishing campaign against the US Power Grid. The possible Russian manipulation of the US election with cyber attacks and rogue social media campaigns is still a story not going away, while the Chinese are alleged to be behind the data theft of Australian F-35 fighter jet, in what is described as an 'extensive' Cyberattack. The finger was pointed at Iran for the recent Parliamentary Emails cyber attacks in the UK, meanwhile, EU governments venting their cyber concern, warning that Cyber Attacks can be an Act of War.
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How to start a Career in Cyber Security

I received an infographic by cybersecurityjobs.net on the top ten tips on landing a cyber security job, I  thought it provided excellent advice for budding cyber security professionals looking to gain a foothold. There is a considerable shortage of experienced cyber security professionals in the UK, but starting out in cyber security is a 'chicken and egg' scenario, in that it can be difficult to land a cyber security job without having the experience, but you can't get the necessary experience without being in a dedicated cyber security role. If you are struggling to get into the industry I recommend initially specialising in a specific area of security, undertake training and gain qualifications. Be patient, expand upon your areas of knowledge and experience, working your way up in different roles to your dream cyber security job. Dream big, but think small.
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Krack WiFi Attack: Vulnerabilities in WPA2 Protocol

All Wi-Fi connections are potentially vulnerable to a newly discovered security attack called "Krack", which allows an attacker to listen in on internet traffic (a Man-in-the-Middle Attack) over a wireless network. In theory, a hacker could read your web and email communications, and even inject malware like ransomware onto your device. Krack takes advantage of unpatched Apple, Android, and Windows operation systems, while unpatched Wi-Fi access points can be manipulated to orchestrate the man-in-the-middle attack.The sky is not falling in on WiFi, this is not like the WEP protocol situation of many years ago, WEP is a security protocol fundamentally flawed by design, WPA2 encryption is not broken, the software that uses it needs to be corrected to secure it. Wireless Access Points (APs) and operating systems that use WPA2 are (or soon will be) patchable, which protects them from this attack.For a video demo of the attack see - https://www.krackattacks.com/#demo For the full technical details of the WPA2 flaw and attack method see - https://papers.mathyvanhoef.com/ccs2017.pdfWireless Usage AdviceMake sure your laptop operating system has the very latest security updates patched (always) i.e. Windows, Linux, Mac. Microsoft said they have already patched Windows systems, but at this time have not confirmed details about...
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