Trends in IT-Security and IAM in 2021, the “New Normal” and beyond

Article by Dennis Okpara, Chief Security Architect & DPO at IDEE GmbH

Yes, there is hope for 2021, but the challenges of the “New Normal” are here to stay. CISOs have to prepare and start acting now, because cybersecurity and the IT-infrastructure will have to face threats that have only just started.

The year 2020 was the year working from home lost its oddity status and became normality. Big names like Google and Twitter are planning long-term and hold out the prospect of working from home on a permanent basis. More than 60 percent of companies are trying the same and have implemented home office policies in 2020. But with great flexibility comes great responsibility: Everyone responsible for Cybersecurity and a secure IT infrastructure is now dealing with new challenges closing the last gaps and weak points when it comes to allowing access to company resources. Dennis Okpara, Chief Security Architect & DPO at IDEE GmbH, the specialist for secure identity access management (IAM), authentication and authorization, shows the top 3 issues CISOs have to look out for:

1. The Problem with Insider Threats will only get Worse
With more and more people working from home, the use of personal devices and working on private networks only increases and further fuels the risk of insider threats. This does not come as a surprise. As early as in 2018, Verizon’s Data Breach Investigation Report already recorded an increase in threats from “internal actors,” meaning employees who knowingly or unknowingly illegally disseminated data and other company information. According to the 2020 report, insiders were responsible for a data breach in a flabbergasting 30% of cases.

The case of Twitter in the summer of 2020 illustrates the damage vividly an insider threat can create. Hackers used social engineering to exploit the insecurity of IT employees and thus gain access to internal systems. Of course, it is quite unlikely that any of Twitter’s employees acted with malicious intent, still, they became the tool for an attack. The result: although the ATOs (Account Take Over) was used for fairly obvious scam posts, the attackers captured well over $100,000.

No company is immune to such attacks, and even strict cybersecurity policies have little effect because they are very difficult to enforce or monitor when people are working from home. Therefore, it can be assumed that the number of insider threats will increase by more than 20% in 2021.

2. Ransomware and Shadow-IT are bound to become the CISOs nightmare
Working from home came suddenly for most companies and pretty much overnight, and even still, most corporations are not sufficiently prepared for the challenges that lie ahead. Unlike in the office, where the IT department can reasonably reliably control the distribution of software on employee PCs, the use of home networks and private devices opens up new attack vectors for hackers.

Employees often use third-party services, download free software, or use private cloud services as a workaround when corporate services are not available. The storage of documents, access to data or other sensitive information on private devices will also continue to increase without CISOs being able to control this. Since private devices and networks are usually inadequately protected, they serve as a gateway for ransomware, which then attacks corporate networks, encrypts data and extorts high ransoms. Gartner analysts have already predicted a 700% increase in 2017 – the growth from the New Normal will dwarf those numbers and give CISOs many sleepless nights. Due to system and network vulnerabilities, misconfigurations, phishing, and the increase in credential attacks, we will likely see an exponential increase in ransomware attacks in 2021.

3. Mobile Devices Become a Favourite Target for Hackers
Developments such as multi-factor authentication (MFA) is improving the security of access to corporate services. On the flip side, it has put mobile devices in the crosshair of hackers. As smartphones are now practical for almost all online activities, the number of attack vectors has grown steadily along with them. In addition to malware, which can be easily installed via third-party apps, especially on Android, and data manipulation or the exploitation of recovery vulnerabilities (such as the interception of magic links or PIN text messages), social engineering is a particularly popular field here.

In addition to the widespread phishing e-mail, vishing (manipulation of employees by fictitious calls from IT staff) and smishing (which works similarly to phishing but uses SMS instead of e-mail) will increase sharply. Hackers will come up with new tricks to compromise mobile devices, and that can only make digital fraud worse.

2021: The Year We Abolish Trust
In a year in which we will have to learn a lot of things anew, CISOs are well-advised to not build anything on trust – neither their network infrastructure nor their IAM. Zero-trust architectures that question all access to corporate resources must become the standard in the age of the New Normal. Restricting resource access to a physical address or IP address, or to VPN access, is counterproductive and difficult to manage if employees are to work from remote locations. Digital identity will shift from user identity to the combined identity of the device and the user. Only this will enable modern and secure identity & access management.


*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from IT Security Expert Blog authored by SecurityExpert. Read the original post at: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/securityexpert/~3/xijLryaEtXs/trends-in-it-security-and-iam-in-2021.html