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6-Step Security Awareness Checklist for College Students

Introduction

Technology plays a huge role in a student’s life on campus. It’s how they socialize with friends and family, work on assignments and handle their finances. Like anything that plays such a large role in life, it’s important to keep it safe.

That’s where security awareness comes into play! Essentially, security awareness is the knowledge you need to keep your digital life private and secure.

College students face unique cybersecurity threats. Between class registration and social media, much of their personal information is digitized. They often work in public spaces like libraries or cafes with unsecured networks. Open living situations like dormitories can also pose a threat, with laptops and smartphones vulnerable to theft.

With that in mind, this article will focus specifically on Internet safety for college students. The following is a security awareness checklist with six steps covering how students can protect their digital lives throughout their time at college and beyond.

The Checklist

1. Avoid Phishing Scams

Have you ever gotten a strangely-worded email asking you to open an attachment or follow a link to an external website? If so, there’s a good chance this was a phishing scam.

Phishing scams will often attempt to mimic a legitimate institution, like a bank or university, and will ask you to divulge information like your login, bank account number or Social Security number. Additionally, they will often aim to create a sense of panic or urgency for the user by claiming there was unauthorized activity on your account that you should fix immediately. While these scams are dangerous because you can potentially lose highly-sensitive information about yourself, you know also easily learn to spot them if you know what to expect.

You can read about the ten most common phishing scams here.

Some common warning signs of phishing (Read more...)

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from InfoSec Resources authored by Christine McKenzie. Read the original post at: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/infosecResources/~3/7I1oT7jdaDM/