Hyperbole in Breach Reporting

While reading the news this morning about yet another successful data breach, I couldn’t help but wonder if the hyperbole used in reporting about data breaches is stifling our ability to educate key stakeholders on what they really need to know.

Today’s example is about a firm that many rely on for security strategy, planning, and execution. The article I read stated that they were “targeted by a sophisticated hack” but later explains that the attacker compromised a privileged account that provided unrestricted “access to all areas”. And, according to sources, the account only required a basic password with no two-step or multi-factor authentication. That doesn’t sound too sophisticated, does it? Maybe they brute-forced it, or maybe they just guessed the password (or found it written down in an office?)

It reminded me of an attack on a security vendor back in 2011. As I recall, there was a lot of talk of the sophistication and complexity of the attack. It was called an Advanced Persistent Threat (and maybe some aspects of it were advanced). But, when the facts came out, an employee simply opened an email attachment that introduced malware into the environment – again, not overly sophisticated in terms of what we think a hack to be.

The quantity, availability, and effectiveness of attack techniques are enough to make anyone uncomfortable with their security posture. I previously wrote about a German company who, in a breach response, wrote that it is “virtually impossible to provide viable protection against organized, highly professional hacking attacks.” CISOs are being told that they should expect to be breached. The only questions are about when and how to respond. It makes you feel like there’s no hope; like there’s no point in trying.

However, if you look at the two examples above that were described as highly sophisticated, they may have been avoided with simple techniques such as employee education, malware detection, and multi-factor authentication. I don’t mean to over-simplify. I’m not saying it’s all easy or that these companies are at-fault or negligent. I’m just calling for less hyperbole in the reporting. Call out the techniques that help companies avoid similar attacks. Don’t describe an attack as overly sophisticated if it’s not. It makes people feel even more helpless when, perhaps, there are some simple steps that can be taken to reduce the attack surface.

I’d also advocate for more transparency from those who are attacked. Companies shouldn’t feel like they have to make things sound more complicated or sophisticated than they are. There’s now a growing history of reputable companies (including in the security industry) who have been breached. If you’re breached, you’re in good company. Let’s talk in simple terms about the attacks that happen in the real world. An “open kimono” approach will be more effective at educating others in prevention. And again, less hyperbole – we don’t need to overplay to emotion here. Everyone is scared enough. We know the harsh reality of what we (as security professionals) are facing. So, let’s strive to better understand the real attack surface and how to prioritize our efforts to reduce the likelihood of a breach.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Matt Flynn: Information Security | Identity & Access Mgmt. authored by Matthew Flynn. Read the original post at: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MattFlynnsIdentityManagementBlog/~3/q9zNUyFDyN8/hyperbole-in-breach-reporting.html