New World, New Rules: Securing the Future State

I published an article today on the Oracle Cloud Security blog that takes a look at how approaches to information security must adapt to address the needs of the future state (of IT). For some organizations, it's really the current state. But, I like the term future state because it's inclusive of more than just cloud or hybrid cloud. It's the universe of Information Technology the way it will be in 5-10 years. It includes the changes in user behavior, infrastructure, IT buying, regulations, business evolution, consumerization, and many other factors that are all evolving simultaneously.As we move toward that new world, our approach to security must adapt. Humans chasing down anomalies by searching through logs is an approach that will not scale and will not suffice. I included a reference in the article to a book called Afterlife. In it, the protagonist, FBI Agent Will Brody says "If you never change tactics, you lose the moment the enemy changes theirs." It's a fitting quote. Not only must we adapt to survive, we need to deploy IT on a platform that's designed for constant change, for massive scale, for deep analytics, and for autonomous security. New World,...
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Hyperbole in Breach Reporting

While reading the news this morning about yet another successful data breach, I couldn't help but wonder if the hyperbole used in reporting about data breaches is stifling our ability to educate key stakeholders on what they really need to know.Today's example is about a firm that many rely on for security strategy, planning, and execution. The article I read stated that they were "targeted by a sophisticated hack" but later explains that the attacker compromised a privileged account that provided unrestricted "access to all areas". And, according to sources, the account only required a basic password with no two-step or multi-factor authentication. That doesn't sound too sophisticated, does it? Maybe they brute-forced it, or maybe they just guessed the password (or found it written down in an office?)It reminded me of an attack on a security vendor back in 2011. As I recall, there was a lot of talk of the sophistication and complexity of the attack. It was called an Advanced Persistent Threat (and maybe some aspects of it were advanced). But, when the facts came out, an employee simply opened an email attachment that introduced malware into the environment - again, not overly sophisticated in terms...
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Encryption would NOT have saved Equifax

I read a few articles this week suggesting that the big question for Equifax is whether or not their data was encrypted. The State of Massachusetts, speaking about the lawsuit it filed, said that Equifax "didn't put in safeguards like encryption that would have protected the data." Unfortunately, encryption, as it's most often used in these scenarios, would not have actually prevented the exposure of this data. This breach will have an enormous impact, so we should be careful to get the facts right and provide as much education as possible to law makers and really to anyone else affected.We know that the attack took advantage of a flaw in Apache Struts (that should have been patched). Struts is a framework for building applications. It lives at the application tier. The data, obviously, resides at the data tier. Once the application was compromised, it really doesn't matter if the data was encrypted because the application is allowed to access (and therefore to decrypt) the data.I won't get into all the various encryption techniques that are possible but there are two common types of data encryption for these types of applications. There's...
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Layered Database Security in the age of Data Breaches

We live in a time of daily breach notifications. One recently affected organization in Germany put out a statement which said: "The incident is not attributable to security deficiencies." and "Human error can also be ruled out." They went on say that it is "virtually impossible to provide viable protection against organized, highly professional hacking attacks." It's a tough climate we find ourselves in. It  just feels too hard or impossible at times. And there's some truth to that. There are way too many potential attack vectors for comfort. Many breaches occur in ways that make it difficult to pinpoint exactly what might have prevented it. Or, the companies involved hide details about what actually happened or how. In some cases, they lie. They might claim there was some Advanced Persistent Threat on the network when in reality, it was a simple phishing attack where credentials were simply handed over. In one recent case, a third party vendor apparently uploaded a database file to an unsecured Amazon AWS server. A media outlet covering the story called out that it was not hacking because the data was made so easily available. Numerous checkpoints come to mind that each...
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Next Generation IDaaS: Moving From Tactical to Strategic

Today, I posted a blog entry to the Oracle Identity Management blog titled Next Generation IDaaS: Moving From Tactical to Strategic. In the post, I examine the evolution of IDaaS and look toward the next generation of Enterprise Identity and Access Management. I believe that the adoption of IDaaS by enterprises has typically been a reactive, tactical response to the quick emergence of SaaS (and the associated loss of control). The next generation of IDaaS will be more strategic and carefully planned to better meet evolving enterprise requirements.Note that I'm not talking about the technology. Nor am I talking about consumer use-cases or developer adoption of outsourced authentication. In this post, I'm looking at IDaaS from the perspective of enterprise IAM and the on-going Digital Transformation.Here's a few quotes that capture the essence:First generation Identity as a Service (IDaaS) was a fashion statement that’s on its way out. It was cool while it lasted. And it capitalized on some really important business needs. But it attempted to apply a tactical fix to a strategic problem.Security functions are coalescing into fewer solutions that cover more ground with less management overhead. Digital...
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