Cyber Security Roundup for March 2019

The potential threat posed by Huawei to the UK national infrastructure continues to be played out. GCHQ called for a ban on Huawei technology within UK critical networks, such as 5G networks, while Three said a Huawei ban would delay the UK 5G rollout, and the EU ignored the US calls to ban Huawei in 5G rollouts, while promoting the EU Cybersecurity certification scheme to counter the Chinese IT threat, which is all rather confusing.  Meanwhile, Microsoft Researchers found an NSA-style Backdoor in Huawei Laptops, which was reported to Huawei by Microsoft, leading to the flaw being patched in January 2019.

A serious security flaw placed Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) customers at risk. The vulnerability was discovered by PenTest Partners in the bank provided ‘Heimdal Thor’, security software, which was meant to protect NatWest customers from cyber-attacks but actually permitted remote injection commands at the customer’s endpoint. PenTest Partners said “We were able to gain access to a victim’s computer very easily. Attackers could have had complete control of that person’s emails, internet history and bank details. To do this we had to intercept the user’s internet traffic but that is quite simple to do when you consider the unsecured public wi-fi out there, and it’s often all too easy to compromise home wi-fi setups.
 

Facebook made negative security headlines yet against after they disclosed that 20,000 of their employees had access to hundreds of millions of their user account passwords for years.


One of the world’s biggest aluminium producers, 
Norsk Hydrosuffered production outages after a ransomware outbreak impacted its European and US operations.  Damages from ransomware attack on Norsk Hydro reach as high as $40M.

Citrix disclosed a security breach of its internal network may have compromised 6Tb of sensitive data. The FBI had told Citrix that international cyber criminals had likely gained access to its internal network. Citrix said in a statement it had taken action to contain the breach, “We commenced a forensic investigation; engaged a leading cyber security firm to assist; took actions to secure our internal network; and continue to cooperate with the FBI”.  According to security firm Resecurity, the attacks were perpetrated by Iranian-linked group known as IRIDIUM.


Credit monitoring Equifax admitted in a report it didn’t follow its own patching schedule, neglecting to patch Apache Struts which led to a major 2017 breach which impacted 145 million people.  The report also said Equifax delayed alerting their customers for 6 weeks after detecting the breach.

ASUS computers had backdoors added through its software update system, in an attack coined “ShadowHammer”. Kaspersky researchers estimated malware was distributed to nearly a million people, although the cybercriminals appeared to have only targeted 600 specific devices. Asus patched the vulnerability but questions still remain.


The top 10 biggest breaches of 2018 according to 4iQ were:

  1. Anti-Public Combo Collections – (Hacked) Sanixer Collection #1-6, 1.8 billion unique email addresses.
  2. Aadhaar, India – (Open third party device) 1.1 billion people affected
  3. Marriott Starwood Hotels – (Hacked) 500 million guests PII
  4. Exactis – (Open device) 340 million people and businesses.
  5. HuaZhu Group – (Accidental Exposure) 240 million records
  6. Apollo – (Open device) 150 million app users.
  7. Quora – (Hacked) 100 million users.
  8. Google+ – (API Glitch) 52.2 million users.
  9. Chegg – (Hacked) 40 million accounts 
  10. Cathay Pacific Airways (Targeted attack) 9.4 million passengers.

Barracuda Networks reported the top 12 phishing email subject lines, after they analysed 360,000 phishing emails over a three-month period.
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*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from IT Security Expert Blog authored by SecurityExpert. Read the original post at: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/securityexpert/~3/ma19eS5-2O4/cyber-security-roundup-for-march-2019.html