Biggest data breaches of 2019 so far

Introduction

2019 is a case of “here we go again” in terms of data breaches. According to Verizon’s Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) for 2019, financial gain is behind 75% of attacks. And to add more concern, a World Economic Forum report has identified cyberattacks and data theft as being likely to be “higher than average” in 2019.

Data exposure is now a fact of corporate and daily life. However, forewarned is forearmed: being cybersecurity-aware of cyberattacks and how they happen can help prevent them.

With this in mind, here are some of the largest data breaches, to mid-year 2019.

8 of the biggest data breaches of 2019

The following are in order of date, showing the name of the organization breached and the numbers of user accounts affected:

Evite: 10 million

Social platform Evite was hacked in February of 2019 with the exposure of names, usernames, email addresses, passwords and, potentially also, dates of birth, phone numbers and mailing addresses. The breach involved unauthorized access to an inactive data storage file associated with user accounts.

Toyota: 3.1 million

February and March of 2019 saw two separate data breaches at the car manufacturer Toyota. Although the jury is still out on how the attack happened, it is suspected to be a highly targeted data breach.

Industry sources are pointing to a Vietnamese hacking group who used an advanced persistent threat (APT) known as APT32 or the OceanLotus group. The group has allegedly been associated with supporting Vietnam’s interest in the automotive industry.

American Medical Collection Agency (AMCA): 20+ million

Between February 2018 and March 2019, medical data and financial information, including bank account details, were exposed in a data breach at a number of organizations, including healthcare billing company Optum360.

The initial breach was discovered by Gemini Advisory when (Read more...)

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Infosec Resources authored by Susan Morrow. Read the original post at: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/infosecResources/~3/dqtF8PPOxjg/