CySA+: Maintaining certification

Introduction

Maintaining your CompTIA Cybersecurity Analysts (CySA+) certification is necessary to keep it active. CySA+ maintenance requirements ensure that you are complying with CompTIA certification policies and that you have up-to-date skills and knowledge required to use and configure threat detection tools, conduct data analysis and interpret results to find threats, risks and vulnerabilities to an organization.

In this article, we will take a closer look into CySA+ renewal requirements, CySA+ retake policy, CompTIA’s Continuing Education (CE) policy and the benefits of maintaining CySA+ certification.

What are the CySA+ renewal requirements?

CompTIA offers a Continuing Education (CE) program to help students keep their credentials valid. A CE program involves various training programs and activities to renew your CompTIA CySA+ certification. A candidate must earn at least 60 Continuing Education Units (CEUs) in three years to renew his account automatically.

What do I need to know about the CySA+ retake policy?

If a candidate fails the first attempt at the CompTIA CySA+ exam, they can apply for the second attempt immediately. CompTIA doesn’t require any waiting period between the first and the second attempt to pass this exam. However, it will not be the case if a candidate fails a third attempt or any subsequent attempt; if this happens, he or she will have to wait 14 calendar days from the date of his or her last attempt to try the CySA+ exam again.

Once you have successfully passed your CySA+ certification, you cannot retake the exam with the same exam code, unless you gain prior permission from CompTIA.

Candidates must adhere to CompTIA retake policy. Repeat violations will subject to a permanent suspension of your CySA+ certification.

What do I need in order to adhere to CompTIA’s Continuing Education policies?

As previously mentioned, CompTIA’s Continuing Education (CE) program help candidates (Read more...)

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Infosec Resources authored by Fakhar Imam. Read the original post at: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/infosecResources/~3/WOIaucnfSbQ/