Researchers discover Spectre like new speculative flaw, “SPOILER” in Intel CPU’s

Intel CPU’s are reportedly vulnerable to a new attack: “SPOILER: Speculative Load Hazards Boost Rowhammer and Cache Attacks”. The vulnerability takes advantage of speculative execution in the Intel CPU’s, and was discovered by computer scientists at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts, and the University of Lübeck in Germany. According to the research, the flaw is a “novel microarchitectural leakage which reveals critical information about physical page mappings to user space processes.”

The flaw can be exploited by malicious JavaScript within a web browser tab, malware running on the system or any illicit logged in users, to steal sensitive information and other data from running applications. The research paper further states that the leakage can be exploited only by a limited set of instructions, and is visible in all Intel generations starting from the 1st generation Intel Core processors, while being independent of the OS. It also works from within virtual machines and sandboxed environments.

The flaw is very similar to the Spectre attacks that were revealed in July, last year. The Spoiler attack also takes advantage of speculative execution- like the Spectre attack- and reveals memory layout data, making it easy for other attacks like Rowhammer, cache attacks, and JavaScript-enabled attacks to be executed.

“The root cause of the issue is that the memory operations execute speculatively and the processor resolves the dependency when the full physical address bits are available,” says Ahmad Moghimi, one of the researchers who contributed to the paper. “Physical address bits are security sensitive information and if they are available to user space, it elevates the user to perform other micro architectural attacks.”

Intel was informed of the findings in early December, last year. However, they did not immediately respond to the researchers.  An Intel spokesperson has now provided Techradar with the following statement on the Spoiler vulnerability: “Intel received notice of this research, and we expect that software can be protected against such issues by employing side channel safe software development practices. This includes avoiding control flows that are dependent on the data of interest. We likewise expect that DRAM modules mitigated against Rowhammer style attacks remain protected. Protecting our customers and their data continues to be a critical priority for us and we appreciate the efforts of the security community for their ongoing research.”

Impact of SPOILER by performing Rowhammer attack in a native user-level environment

The research paper defines the Rowhammer attack as : “an attack causing cells of a victim row to leak faster by activating the neighboring rows repeatedly. If the refresh cycle fails to refresh the victim fast enough, that leads to bit flips. Once bit flips are found, they can be exploited by placing any security-critical data structure or code page at that particular location and triggering the bit flip again.”

  1. In order to perform a Rowhammer attack, the adversary needs to access DRAM rows that are adjacent to a victim row and ensure that multiple virtual pages co-locate on the same bank.
  2. Double-sided Rowhammer attacks cause bit flips faster owing to the extra charge on the nearby cells of the victim row and they further require access to contiguous memory pages. SPOILER can help boosting both single and double-sided Rowhammer attacks by its additional 8-bit physical address information and result in the detection of contiguous memory.
  3. The researchers used SPOILER to detect aliased virtual memory addresses where the 20 LSBs of the physical addresses match. These bits were then used by the memory controller for mapping the physical addresses to the DRAM banks.
  4. The  majority of the bits are known using SPOILER. Further, “a attacker can directly hammer such aliased addresses to perform a more efficient single-sided Rowhammer attack with a significantly increased probability of hitting the same bank.”
  5. The researchers reverse engineered the DRAM mappings for different hardware configurations using the DRAMA tool, and only a few bits of physical address entropy beyond the 20 bits remain unknown.
  6. To verify if aliased virtual addresses co-locate on the same bank, they used the row-conflict side channel
  7. It is observed that whenever the number of physical address bits used by the memory controller to map data to physical memory is equal to or less than 20,  the researchers always hit the same bank.

To summarize their findings, SPOILER drastically improves the efficiency of finding addresses mapping to the same bank without the need of an administrative privilege or a reverse engineering of the memory controller mapping. This approach also works in sandboxed environments such as JavaScript.

You can go through the Research paper for more insights on the SPOILER flaw.

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*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Security News – Packt Hub authored by Melisha Dsouza. Read the original post at: https://hub.packtpub.com/researchers-discover-spectre-like-new-speculative-flaw-spoiler-in-intel-cpus/