InSecurity Podcast: Pete Herzog on Teaching Kids to Hack

What if I told you that we could save the world by teaching kids to hack early in life? Pete Herzog thinks that might be the way to go.

Is he right?

The word “hacking” has reached an almost mystical status for those outside the true hackerverse. Pete Herzog wants to teach young people the skills involved in hacking in order to provide them with the additional tools that come along with those skills.

As a third generation of hackers enters the workplace, there are questions to be discussed… Why is hacking relevant today? Is hacking a bad thing? What does hacking even mean?

In this episode of the InSecurity Podcast, host Matt Stephenson is joined by special guest Pete Herzog, co-founder of ISECOM and Hacker High School. Pete is one of the leading voices encouraging today’s young people to learn how to hack. We’ll dig into these questions about hacking and what it means to be a hacker in the modern world of cybersecurity.

About Pete Herzog

Pete Herzog (@peteherzog) is the co-founder of ISECOM and Hacker High School, and in 2000, Pete created the OSSTMM standards for security testing and analysis. He also leads the organization into new research challenges like Smarter Safer Better, the Bad People Project, and the Home Security Methodology. Pete’s strong interest in the properties of trust and how it affects us and our lives has led to trust metrics and has brought ISECOM more deeply into Human Security

About Matt Stephenson

Insecurity Podcast host Matt Stephenson (@packmatt73) leads the Security Technology team at Cylance, which puts him in front of crowds, cameras, and microphones all over the world. He is the regular host of the InSecurity podcast and host of CylanceTV.

Twenty years of work with the world’s (Read more...)

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Cylance Blog authored by Cylance Podcasts and Matt Stephenson. Read the original post at: https://threatvector.cylance.com/en_us/home/insecurity-podcast-pete-herzog-on-teaching-kids-to-hack.html