Developer claims anti-virus does not improve security

  • New anti-malware vendors sometimes disparage more established vendors as providing less sophisticated products as a marketing tool.
  • Windows developers at Microsoft don’t like the perception (which is sometimes the truth) that anti-malware products slow down Windows. When a user has a bad Windows experience, for whatever reason, Microsoft feels the impact.
  • Other developers hate that anti-malware products embed themselves into Windows in sometimes strange and unusual ways, causing potential havoc with their own efforts and possibly introducing new and powerful security vulnerabilities. Anti-malware vendors argue that they need to do this to prevent particularly nasty threats from digging in at the lowest security levels within the operating system.
  • Users who have never (knowingly) suffered a malware attack often question the very necessity for anti-malware.
  • Some testers/ researchers make it their life’s mission to discover technical problems with anti-malware, sometimes apparently taking the position that “anti-malware is bad for you,” rather than, “you need it, it’s a bit broken but here’s how to fix it.”

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from SPECIAL EDITION authored by Simon PG Edwards. Read the original post at: http://blog.selabs.uk/2017/01/anti-virus-is-bad-dead-again-and-worse.html